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Frequently asked questions about devolution

Frequently asked questions about devolution

  • Chesterfield Borough Council’s leader has pulled the council’s devolution bid to avoid an unnecessary waste of public money on a referendum called by Derbyshire County Council’s leader Councillor Barry Lewis.

    Find out more about this decision here.

    Please note: other information on this page may now be out of date, and will be amended.

This section contains responses to questions we have been asked about devolution. 


Devolution frequently asked questions

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It's still early days in terms of understanding the full impact of Brexit referendum decision on funding for local areas but this is a UK wide issue not just a Sheffield City Region issue. 

One thing that is clear is that areas getting additional funding through a devolution deal will be far better placed to deal with any potential reductions in funding than areas without one. 

Sheffield City Region leaders and private sector Local Enterprise Board business leaders will be lobbying the Government to ask that the area gets an equivalent amount of money from central Government to replace any EU funding that may be lost following the referendum decision. 

For the time being the Government has told areas to press ahead with devolution deal consultations and plans as originally intended. 

A consultation took place from 1 July to 12 August on the issue. Residents and businesses were encouraged to take part by visiting www.sheffieldcityregionconsultation.org.uk. The deadline to complete the survey was midnight on Friday 12 August.

The results are available here: Sheffield City Region devolution consultation results.

 

 

Information is available in these web pages about devolution, see the menu links for more information.

We have also held four public consultation events for residents to find out more about the consultation and the devolution deal including at the Winding Wheel on Monday 11 July, a drop-in event at the Market Hall on Friday 15 July, a stall at the medieval market on Tuesday 26 July and a drop-in session at the Healthy Living Centre on Monday 8 August.

August to October 2013 – Consultation on plans for a Sheffield City Region combined authority.

January 2015 – Consultation on a proposed Derby and Derbyshire combined authority (which was later ruled out as an option by the Government)

December 2015 to January 2016 – Consultation on the Sheffield City Region devolution deal agreed with the Government.

In Chesterfield this included:

  • Four public meetings – attended by 146 people
  • A meeting attended by 120 business leaders in Chesterfield
  • An e-bulletin to more than 400 community and voluntary organisation representatives
  • An e-bulletin going to 1,500 local business people encouraging them to take part

Promotion of the consultation to the public in the local media (in print, on websites, on social media), on the council’s website and social media.

Devolution is the passing of powers and responsibilities currently held by the national Government in London to regions elsewhere in the country.  

It gives us more control over things that we want for our town, and we can decide at a local level what matters to us and our future.

No, joining the Sheffield City Region Mayoral Combined Authority will not make any change to Chesterfield’s geographical boundaries. Chesterfield is and will remain a part of Derbyshire.   

Chesterfield has been part of the Sheffield City Region, following a public consultation, since 2014. It did not leave Derbyshire then and it will not do so now that it is applying to upgrade to be a full member.

No, definitely not. We are not merging with Sheffield City Council – or any council. Sheffield City Council will continue to be in charge of day-to-day issues in their area and we and Derbyshire County Council will continue to be in charge of ones in our area. Their schools, social services, rubbish collection, street cleaning and so on will have nothing to do with us and they will have nothing to do with the same services in Chesterfield. 

Sheffield City Council runs services for its residents in the same way Chesterfield Borough Council and Derbyshire County Council run services for Chesterfield residents. 

Sheffield City Region is a completely different organisation set up to manage different powers to everyday local council matters. 

The Sheffield City Region Combined Authority is an organisation set up to take decisions on issues not currently in the direct control of local councils – powers that are generally held by the Government in London. 

The Sheffield City Region Combined Authority is made up of local council leaders from Chesterfield, Sheffield, Barnsley, Doncaster and Rotherham. Bassetlaw has also applied to be a full member.  

The authority involves these councils so that elected leaders have the power to influence overall decision making. 

Three other councils – Bolsover District Council, Derbyshire Dales District Council and North East Derbyshire District Council – have also been part of the authority since 2014 as non-constituent members. This means they don’t have voting rights but can take part in discussions.

No, all the services we deliver will continue to be delivered by Chesterfield Borough Council. Devolution isn’t about giving our power away, it’s about transferring decision making and funding from national Government to regional devolution areas, to deliver major regeneration, infrastructure and business growth schemes.

There will be some changes to transport powers currently held by Derbyshire County Council. The mayor of the Combined Authority would have control over some public transport issues to ensure services are more integrated across administrative boundaries so they better meet the needs of local people.

Derbyshire County Council will still be responsible for maintaining the highways in the county including issues such as winter gritting and repairing pot holes.

No. With the exception of some transport powers (see answer above) Derbyshire County Council will continue to provide all its normal services in Chesterfield. These include schools; children and family social care services, including adoption and fostering; adult social care services; adult education; libraries; youth centres; recycling and waste collection centres; trading standards and register offices among others.

The only area where there will be a change to their powers is transport – But the county council will still be responsible for highways maintenance in the county.

With more funding available, many services are likely to be better than they currently are. Chesterfield Borough Council expects no reduction to services as a consequence of seeking full membership of the Shefield City Region Mayoral Combined Authority.

Chesterfield has been an active member of the Sheffield City Region since joining the Sheffield City Region Local Enterprise Partnership in 2010. This recognises the fact that Chesterfield’s economic links are largely with the Sheffield City Region area, with much retail, commuting and business done both ways across traditional geographical boundaries.

Businesses in the town tell us that their business links and trading is much stronger in this area than to the whole East Midlands area.

While we have strong links with the northern part of Derbyshire the economic and social ties between Chesterfield and Nottingham, Nottinghamshire and Derby are not as strong as with the Sheffield and South Yorkshire area.

That doesn’t mean people in Derbyshire want to become part of Yorkshire – in the same way that having that all Chesterfield residents having a Sheffield postcode doesn’t mean they are part of Yorkshire.

No. Councils across Derbyshire were asked to give their views first and indicate which devolution deal they would like to be part of and which combined authority they would like to become a full (constituent) member of.

Consultation is currently taking place with residents and local businesses before a final decision is made in the autumn.

The Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, will make a decision about whether or not to take forward the proposals for Sheffield City Region. They would then need to be ratified by Parliament.

Amber Valley Borough Council, Erewash District Council and South Derbyshire District Council all decided not to be part of the North Midlands Combined Authority. 

High Peak Borough Council has decided not to join the North Midlands Combined Authority. It will instead re-open negotiations with the Greater Manchester Combined Authority about an economic arrangement that better meets the needs of their residents.

Bolsover District Council, North East Derbyshire District Council and Derbyshire Dales District Council have all decided to join the North Midlands Combined Authority as a full (constituent) member and continue in the Sheffield City Region Combined Authority as a non-constituent member. 

Bassetlaw District Council has decided to apply for full membership of the Sheffield City Region Combined Authority and non-constituent membership of the North Midlands Combined Authority.

All other Nottinghamshire district councils have indicated they want to be part of the North Midlands Combined Authority. 

Chesterfield Borough Council doesn’t want an elected mayor but the Government will not give local areas the full powers without one. It is part of the package that comes with devolution. The areas that have been offered the biggest devolution deals – Greater Manchester and the Sheffield City Region – are ones that have said they will reluctantly have an elected mayor in return for significant benefits for the local area.  

The elected mayor would not be a 'Sheffield mayor'. He or she would represent the whole city region and be voted for by electors in Chesterfield and electors in the areas of the other full members of Sheffield City Region.

The mayor may end up coming from and/or being based in Chesterfield, Bassetlaw, Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham or Sheffield. 

The mayor would not be controlling Chesterfield Borough Council services run in Chesterfield. Powers and funding controlled by the mayor would be those currently held by central government. 

There will be some changes to transport powers currently held by Derbyshire County Council. The mayor of the Combined Authority would have control over some public transport issues to ensure services are more integrated across administrative boundaries so they better meet the needs of local people.

 

No. Each devolution area must have a directly elected mayor, but they would not replace our own civic mayor. The Sheffield City Region mayor would only be responsible for functions that are specifically part of the devolution deal, such as some transport powers, infrastructure investment, supporting business growth and providing skills and training. Our mayor performs a civic rather than political role. That won’t change. 

We did.

  • In 2013 there was a public consultation about us joining the Sheffield City Region Combined Authority. 
  • In 2015 there was a public consultation about forming a Derby and Derbyshire Combined Authority (which was later ruled out as an option by the Government) 
  • In December 2015 and January 2016, there was a six week public consultation about the Sheffield City Region devolution deal.   
  • Consultation was held with residents and local businesses from 1 July to 12 August. 

The process we followed was exactly the same as all other district and borough councils in Derbyshire.

Chesterfield joined the Sheffield City Region Combined Authority in 2014 following a public consultation and a decision by councillors in 2013.

Information about the devolution deal has been published on the council website, in local newspapers, on local radio and television, and through press releases, photocalls, and on social media.

Members of the business community have also had briefings and e-newsletter updates.

Because that is the way the Government has created devolution deals.

Chesterfield cannot apply for a devolution deal in its own right. The amount of funding an area gets will depend on the quality of the business cases put forward and showing how that will deliver jobs and business growth to an area. 

Businesses in Chesterfield, supported by the council, have a good track record of doing this and the council has also put in its own bids.  Because these have been strong cases, the town has a good track record of getting funding which has delivered jobs, skills and opportunities for business growth across the borough.

The proposals would give the Chesterfield area an equal say with other areas, even though our population is quite a bit smaller. 

There would be two votes for the Chesterfield area (one for Chesterfield Borough Council, one for Derbyshire County Council), the same as for the other areas in South Yorkshire.  So although we are a smaller area, we would get the same say as any other area.


Last updated on 13 June 2017