Rateable values

Rateable values

  • Information about declined payments 

    We are seeing an increase in the number of payments being declined. This is often due to the additional security features the payment card providers are introducing to try to reduce fraudulent payments and protect customers from fraud. Please note, that the council does not have access to any information telling us why your payment was declined. 

    What to do if your payment is declined

    Please contact your card issuer (which may be your bank or credit card provider) and ask them why the payment was declined. They will probably ask you a date and time you tried to make the payment and how much you were trying to pay. If you don’t get a satisfactory answer as to why your payment was declined, asking the following questions may help:

    • Does my card have an upper limit on the amount I can pay for an online transaction?
    • Do you try and contact me if the amount I am trying to pay online is above a certain amount?
    • How are you trying to contact me – do you have my correct contact details?
    • Was the payment declined because I didn’t have enough money in my account? 

    Your card issuer should try and help you so you don’t have future payments declined. 

    Find alternate payment methods

 

Apart from properties that are exempt from Business Rates, each non-domestic property has a rateable value which is normally set by the valuation officers of the Valuation Office Agency (VOA), an agency of the Inland Revenue.

It draws up and maintains a full list of rateable values for non-domestic premises in England and Wales. 

The rateable value of your property will be shown on the front of your bill, this broadly represents the yearly rent the property could have been let for on the open market on a particular date.

For the revaluation that came into effect on 1 April 2017, this date was set as 1 April 2015.

Find your rateable value here.

Appealing against a rateable value

The valuation officer may alter the value if the circumstances of the property have changed. The ratepayer (and certain others who have an interest in the property) can also appeal against the value shown in the list if they believe it is wrong. 

Find out how to check and challenge your business rates rateable value.


Last updated on 30 March 2022